Shar Sosh
Shar Sosh

SHAR SOSH

The Internationally recognized artist, has painted for Presidents,Governments and the everyday person.  She was invited to paint at the U.S. Presidential Millennium Inaugural Ball as well as to paint part of the oldest, most well-known Montmarte subway station in Paris. Her work was chosen to be a part of the William Clinton Presidential One Hundred year time capsule as well. Shar splits her painting time between America and her studio in the artist quarter in Montmartre, Paris. She paints primarily with oils , acrylics and watercolors.  Her oils bring to mind the vivid brightness of true colors. Her brush is truly an extension of her hand and life. She weaves passion and exuberance in each stroke, making the viewer see even more than before. The watercolors reflect Shar’s experiences of travels, life and friends. From controlled gouache to the flowing fjords of Norway, Shar has captured a moment of time to be relived again by all willing to be drawn in. Her use of color will imprint itself on your memory long after the painting is out of view. Her painting has also taken her from Hong Kong to Norway and most places in between. She has works in collections around the world. Shar has been a part of the art industry for over 30 years. She has worked with all media as well as done many live demonstrations. To see these works and more please contact Shar Sosh at Sosh Studios (305) 778-0932 phone in the USA.  

 

SHAR SOSH
SHAR SOSH

“What’s important isn’t only making art,” says Shar Sosh, “but having the mentality of an artist"

 

I paint every day, all the time, so much so that I dream about it. Art isn't something you can put in a box and take out whenever the spirit moves you. It’s who you are.” And this world traveling painter has always had this mentality; she recalls her own earliest memories are of “drawing” her first words. “My hand has always expressed what’s in my mind and heart, ” she says.

 

 

            Sosh’s versatility and openness result, she says, from her parents’ unconditional support and the richness of her childhood experience, which led to a unique openness to a world of emotion and imagination. “I was fortunate that my parents were extremely supportive of me and whatever I wanted to do, and what I wanted to do was paint,” she recalls. “I also consider myself lucky to have been raised in unusual circumstances, which led to my being an artist. I grew up on the grounds of a mental hospital--not as a patient; my father was an X-ray supervisor there--so my family had holidays and meals with the patients all the time. As a result, my concept of so-called ‘normal’ behavior, my sensitivity to people and what they do in life, was very heightened.”

 

            Using the hospital’s treated radiography paper and grease pencils as her tools, she began drawing at a young age: “My father brought me X-ray paper everyday when I was a child. I remember it was bright orange, and to this day orange is my favorite color.” It wasn’t just the surface’s vivid color that influenced Sosh, but also the concept of acutely observing, of rendering people and objects transparent, of seeing into their souls.

 

            For the nearly two decades since she finished her studies at the Art Institute of Chicago, Sosh has been busily following her muse all over the world. Her oil paintings, watercolors, and murals, no matter what the style, medium, or technique, reflect her passion and determination. Made with dramatic, vigorous brush strokes, her work simultaneously expresses sensitivity and confidence, in subjects ranging from candy-colored horses jumping out from a carousel and gray, serene portraits to dynamic Fauvist landscapes brimming with short, flat marks of emerald green, vivid peach, and deep violet.

 

            Like the artist herself, no matter the size or medium, her work is confident and decisive. Encompassing a diverse body of work from delicate watercolors done on her voyages East to bold oils influenced by time spent in Europe, her work mingles experiences in Asia, Europe, and America. Of her many trips to Asia, she says, “I came to know many people and places from Thailand to Taipei, from Hong Kong to Malaysia. I came to know the East, and it became part of me.”

 

 


SHAR SOSH's Studio
SHAR SOSH's Studio

Ahhh Paris, where she worked and lived part-time for nearly a decade. "I’ve always had an attraction to France, even from a very early age," she explains. "From the beginning I felt at home there. It’s the city of art--art is everywhere, and appreciation of art is everywhere. So much American art is expressed or transformed into promotion. But in France, art is part of everyone’s consciousness;

centuries of art are embedded in their culture; so the creative impulse is never stifled there.”

 

            One winter, Sosh returned to Paris for one of her most interesting undertakings: to help renovate one of the city’s oldest, most historic metro stations, Abbesses, located in the heart of the Montmartre district--where such artists as Van Gogh, Toulouse-Lautrec, and Renoir lived and worked. For more than a month, the group replastered and repainted the walls, also creating their own original paintings along its two long, winding, spiral staircases (more than three hundred steps down).

 

            In addition, she has worked on a dramatically smaller scale; her decision to start painting wine bottles, inspired after the opening of one of her shows when she discovered she had run out of canvas but still had the urge to paint, led to a successful solo show at the South Bend Regional Museum of Art. The show, where visitors were greeted at the entrance by a six-foot-high, five-hundred-pound painted bottle carved out of wood (Sosh hired a sculptor to help her with the project), led one into sight of Sosh’s handpainted tables and chairs sitting among the one thousand colorfully painted bottles. The artist’s two most recent projects illustrate beautifully her statement that “I paint everything, and I see everything as a painting.”

 

These bottles let Shar to the Presidential Inagural Millennium ball. Shar Sosh’s role was to paint a series of elegant and whimsical wine and champagne bottles during and for the ball. She also created special personalized painted bottles for both President Clinton and Vice President Gore in addition to presenting President Clinton with a sculpture of her own creation. Sosh’s gift to the President was a hand painted tenor saxophone mounted on a pair of painted steel hands. Sosh based this sculpture on the color scheme red, white and black as chosen by First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton when redecorating the President’s White House study.

 

 

SHAR SOSH

 

 

      Having begun her studies in commercial art at Ivy Tech., Shar Sosh then moved on to the Art Institute of Chicago. She has participated in solo and group exhibitions in the United States, France, Norway, and Tunisia, including annual shows in Paris since 1989 at the Salon Collectif Des Artistes; Gallery LaSalle in South Bend, Indiana; the South Bend Regional Museum of Art; Galerie Fabienne Guez in Paris; Atlas Galleries in Chicago; Rice and Falkenberg Galleries in Palm Beach; The Millenium Presidential Inagural Ball Washington D. C. 1997; the Forum des Halles in Paris; and the Les Carroz in Mont-Blanc; several times, her work has also been featured on the cover of Paris-Montmartre magazine. Her paintings are in many private and corporate collections, including those of NBC Studios and Radio City Music Hall, both in New York City; The White House, Washington D. C.; Kingswood International in Hong Kong; and P.A.M. in Sandnes, Norway. Sosh’s paintings are available here and abroad for both private and corporate collections, museum and gallery sales, and leasing.

 

 

Shar Sosh Studios

soshstudios@gmail.com